The Journal of Spinal Surgery

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2017 | July-September | Volume 4 | Issue 3

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EDITORIAL

Editorial

[Year:2017] [Month:July-September] [Volume:4] [Number:3] [Pages:1] [Pages No:0 - 0]

   DOI: 10.5005/joss-4-3-v  |  Open Access |  How to cite  | 

1,430

RESEARCH ARTICLE

PS Ramani

Scoliosis Surgery

[Year:2017] [Month:July-September] [Volume:4] [Number:3] [Pages:1] [Pages No:0 - 0]

   DOI: 10.5005/joss-4-3-vi  |  Open Access |  How to cite  | 

1,074

RESEARCH ARTICLE

Myung-Sang Moon

Anatomical Location, Running Pattern, and Bifurcation Level of Abdominal Aorta over the Lumbosacral Spine: Computed Tomography Angiographic Study

[Year:2017] [Month:July-September] [Volume:4] [Number:3] [Pages:5] [Pages No:97 - 101]

   DOI: 10.5005/jp-journals-10039-1138  |  Open Access |  How to cite  | 

Abstract

Introduction

Since the last decade, the frequency of anterior lumbar surgeries has dramatically increased for anterior interbody fusion and artificial disk arthroplasty. In this approach, the surgeons frequently encountered complicated neurovascular anatomy, which hindered the wide exposure of the intervertebral disk. Until the last decade, surgeons had preoperatively referred only to the basically described vascular anatomy in textbooks.

Materials and methods

To help the surgeon in this clinical issue, the current authors conducted this computed tomography (CT) angiographic study.

Results

In 7 patients (14.6%), the abdominal aortas were located in the right anterior one-third of the vertebra. In 26 patients (54.2%), they were in the left two-thirds of the anterior vertebral surface, and in 15 patients (31.3%), they were in the middle. In 5 patients, they were located in the extreme left margin of the body.

In the running pattern of aorta, straight vertical aorta in 29 patients (60.4%), curved aorta in 17 patients (35.4%), kinked aorta in 1 (2.1%), and tortuous aorta in 1 (2.1%) were observed.

Abdominal aorta bifurcated at L3 body level in 1 (2.1%), 9 (18.8%) at the L3–L4 disk level, 23 (45.8%) at the L4 body, 12 (25%) at L4–5 disk level, and 4 (8.3%) at L5 body level.

The running pattern of the iliac artery was not constant; there were several types: symmetrical/asymmetrical spreading and straight/curved with widely or narrowly spread ones.

Conclusion

It was found that there is variant vascular anatomy, not described in the textbooks.

How to cite this article

Moon M-S. Anatomical Location, Running Pattern, and Bifurcation Level of Abdominal Aorta over the Lumbosacral Spine: Computed Tomography Angiographic Study. J Spinal Surg 2017;4(3):97-101.

3,023

RESEARCH ARTICLE

Myung-Sang Moon

Magnetic Resonance Imaging Technique of Abdominal Aorta, Vena Cava, and Their Branches—Imaging Time acquired to pick up Those Vessels and Lumbosacral Spine in a Cut

[Year:2017] [Month:July-September] [Volume:4] [Number:3] [Pages:2] [Pages No:102 - 103]

   DOI: 10.5005/jp-journals-10039-1139  |  Open Access |  How to cite  | 

Abstract

Objective

To look for the proper magnetic resonance (MR) imaging time after intravenous contrast medium administration to map the image of the abdominal vessels and lumbosacral spine together in a cut.

Materials and methods

The utilized MR machines were Achieve 1.5T and 3.0T (Philips, the Netherlands) and cut thickness was 4.0 mm. Contrast medium was Iopamidol (Dongkuk Pharma, Seoul, South Korea). For the vessel image, scan was done at 30 seconds after intravenous Iopamidol administration, and then scans were repeated every 10 seconds to pick up the best imaging time in a cut until 150 seconds postcontrast medium administration.

Results

Aorta and its bifurcation could be imaged at 30 seconds postcontrast medium injection. The best wanted image of all the large abdominal vessels and lumbosacral spine together in a cut was obtained at 70 seconds after contrast medium administration. The best peripheral venogram was obtained at 150 seconds.

Summary

This MR imaging time sequence provided easy access to obtain the large abdominopelvic vessels together with the lumbosacral spine in a cut.

How to cite this article

Moon M-S. Magnetic Resonance Imaging Technique of Abdominal Aorta, Vena Cava, and Their Branches—Imaging Time acquired to pick up Those Vessels and Lumbosacral Spine in a Cut. J Spinal Surg 2017;4(3):102-103.

3,858

REVIEW ARTICLE

Current Concepts in the Management of Type II Odontoid Fractures

[Year:2017] [Month:July-September] [Volume:4] [Number:3] [Pages:9] [Pages No:104 - 112]

   DOI: 10.5005/jp-journals-10039-1140  |  Open Access |  How to cite  | 

Abstract

Introduction

Fracture of the odontoid and particularly type II, is the commonest injury in the upper cervical spine. In the past, it was presumed to cause by high velocity road traffic accidents. But now, with the increase in the number of two-wheeler vehicles and sub-standard conditions of indian roads, this type of injury is common. It is usually caused by hyper-extension of the neck but, can be caused by hyper-flexion. The surgical management has remained controversial.

Material and methods

Data was collected from four centres in Maharashtra- India. In one centre, the treatment was posterior C1-C2 stabilization with screws and plate. In centre two, odontoid fracture line was fixed by anterior screws. In the third centre, Magerel technique was used. The fourth centre believed in direct anterior screw and plate fixation of the fracture line.

Analysis

The number of patients operated upon, were too less in each centre to analyse and compare with each other. As a result, use of software analysis was not felt necessary which is in fact the need to assess the best technique which can be used to treat this fracture.

Results

No definite conclusion could be arrived at by studying the pattern of treatment in these four centres.

Conclusion

Way back in 2009, an attempt was made to do a multi-centre retrospective analysis. There was no definite conclusion and even in the present study, no definite conclusion is derived.

How to cite this article

Ramani PS. Current Concepts in the Management of Type II Odontoid Fractures. J Spinal Surg 2017;4(3):104-112.

5,041

RESEARCH ARTICLE

Sushil Patkar, Charushila Patkar

A New Technique of Craniovertebral Fixation

[Year:2017] [Month:July-September] [Volume:4] [Number:3] [Pages:3] [Pages No:113 - 115]

   DOI: 10.5005/jp-journals-10039-1141  |  Open Access |  How to cite  | 

Abstract

How to cite this article

Patkar SV, Patkar C. A New Technique of Craniovertebral Fixation. J Spinal Surg 2017;4(3):113-115.

3,276

RESEARCH ARTICLE

Sarbjit S Chhiber, Altaf U Ramzan, Jangbahuder Singh, Sajad H Arif, Udhay S Raswan

Intramedullary Metastasis to Conus Medullaris

[Year:2017] [Month:July-September] [Volume:4] [Number:3] [Pages:7] [Pages No:116 - 122]

   DOI: 10.5005/jp-journals-10039-1142  |  Open Access |  How to cite  | 

Abstract

How to cite this article

Chhiber SS, Ramzan AU, Singh J, Arif SH, Raswan US. Intramedullary Metastasis to Conus Medullaris. J Spinal Surg 2017;4(3):116-122.

5,076

CASE REPORT

Abul Hasan, Sanjeev Shopra, Devendra K Purohit, Somnath Sharma

Rhombencephalosynapsis and Chiari II Malformation with Spinal Deformities

[Year:2017] [Month:July-September] [Volume:4] [Number:3] [Pages:3] [Pages No:123 - 125]

   DOI: 10.5005/jp-journals-10039-1143  |  Open Access |  How to cite  | 

Abstract

How to cite this article

Hasan A, Shopra S, Purohit DK, Sharma S. Rhombencephalosynapsis and Chiari II Malformation with Spinal Deformities. J Spinal Surg 2017;4(3):123-125.

441

CASE REPORT

Tarek Mostafa, Oluwarotimi B Latinwo, Joan P Grieve, Carmel Curtis, Ayman M Qureshi

Cervical Spinal Cord Intramedullary Abscess: Streptococcus intermedius

[Year:2017] [Month:July-September] [Volume:4] [Number:3] [Pages:4] [Pages No:126 - 129]

   DOI: 10.5005/jp-journals-10039-1144  |  Open Access |  How to cite  | 

Abstract

How to cite this article

Mostafa T, Latinwo OB, Grieve JP, Curtis C, Qureshi AM. Cervical Spinal Cord Intramedullary Abscess: Streptococcus intermedius. J Spinal Surg 2017;4(3):126-129.

351

CASE REPORT

Takeo Furuya, Yasushi Ijima, Junya Saito, Mitsuhiro Kitamura, Sumihisa Orita, Seiji Ohtori, Kazuhide Inage, Toru Funayama, Kosei Miura

De novo Ossification of the Posterior Longitudinal Ligament related to Pseudarthrosis after Anterior Cervical Decompression and Fusion with floating of the Ossification Foci

[Year:2017] [Month:July-September] [Volume:4] [Number:3] [Pages:3] [Pages No:130 - 132]

   DOI: 10.5005/jp-journals-10039-1145  |  Open Access |  How to cite  | 

Abstract

Aim

The aim of this article is to report a case of ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament (OPLL) in a patient who showed a de novo ossification focus compressing the spinal cord at the pseudarthrosis site several years after anterior decompression and fusion treatment for OPLL using the floating method.

Background

Segmental motion of the ossification foci has been reported to promote OPLL development. The OPLL can grow longitudinally and thicken after laminoplasty, which allows segmental motion of the OPLL.

Case report

A 66-year-old man, who has a history of OPLL anterior surgery with floating method 11 year prior, showed a gradual increase in gait disturbance. Imaging analyses revealed a de novo ossification focus at the C6 to 7 pseudarthrosis level compressing the spinal cord anteriorly.

Discussion

The present case showed that there is a possibility of de novo OPLL development after pseudarthrosis of anterior decompression and fusion surgery, even after complete floating of the ossification foci.

Conclusion

The OPLL can develop under certain conditions even after anterior decompression and fusion surgery using a floating method. Thus, rigorous observation is essential for pseudarthrosis even though the initial neurological recovery may be good.

Clinical significance

The present case showed a close relationship between OPLL genesis and segmental motion.

How to cite this article

Koda M, Furuya T, Ijima Y, Saito J, Kitamura M, Orita S, Ohtori S, Inage K, Abe T, Funayama T, Noguchi H, Miura K, Nagashima K, Kumagai H, Yamazaki M. De novo Ossification of the Posterior Longitudinal Ligament related to Pseudarthrosis after Anterior Cervical Decompression and Fusion with floating of the Ossification Foci. J Spinal Surg 2017;4(3):130-132.

1,943

CASE REPORT

Raman M Sharma, Saifullah Khalid, Arif H Sarmast, Mehul Modi, Rahil Rafeeque

Multiple Primary Intraspinal Extradural Hydatid Cyst in a Young Patient

[Year:2017] [Month:July-September] [Volume:4] [Number:3] [Pages:3] [Pages No:133 - 135]

   DOI: 10.5005/jp-journals-10039-1146  |  Open Access |  How to cite  | 

Abstract

Aim

Spinal hydatid disease is a rare entity, and a primary extradural, extraosseous hydatid lesion in spine is rarer, with only a few reported cases in literature. Our aim was to present one such case.

Background

Spinal hydatid disease being a very rare entity, high suspicion should be kept in compressive cystic spinal lesion, especially in endemic countries. Surgery is the treatment of choice with long-term antihelminthic therapy.

Case report

Herein we report a case of a 26-year-old male patient who presented to us with low back pain, progressive paraparesis for last 4 months with urinary retention. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed multiple intraspinal extradural cystic lesions at L1–2, L3–4 and L5–S1 level. Patient underwent laminectomy and complete excision of the cyst. He is under our regular follow-up for last 1 year without any recurrence.

Conclusion

A high level of suspicion is required for proper identification of a rare hydatid lesion in spine in extradural and extraosseous location and surgery is the treatment of choice.

Clinical significance

Hydatid cyst is to be kept as a differential diagnosis in any cystic spinal lesion, especially in an endemic area.

How to cite this article

Sharma RM, Khalid S, Sarmast AH, Modi M, Rafeeque R. Multiple Primary Intraspinal Extradural Hydatid Cyst in a Young Patient. J Spinal Surg 2017;4(3):133-135.

4,052

RESEARCH ARTICLE

Nilesh Agrawal

The Great Neurosurgeon and Spinal Surgery

[Year:2017] [Month:July-September] [Volume:4] [Number:3] [Pages:5] [Pages No:136 - 140]

   DOI: 10.5005/jp-journals-10039-1147  |  Open Access |  How to cite  | 

2,735

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