The Journal of Spinal Surgery

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2014 | July-September | Volume 1 | Issue 3

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EDITORIAL

Editorial

[Year:2014] [Month:July-September] [Volume:1] [Number:3] [Pages:1] [Pages No:0 - 0]

   DOI: 10.5005/joss-1-3-v  |  Open Access |  How to cite  | 

1,063

RESEARCH ARTICLE

Jitin Bajaj, Radhey Shyam Mittal, Achal Sharma

Epidemiology of Spinal Injuries: An Experience in Tertiary and Regional Referral Hospital of Northwest India

[Year:2014] [Month:July-September] [Volume:1] [Number:3] [Pages:4] [Pages No:111 - 114]

   DOI: 10.5005/jp-journals-10039-1024  |  Open Access |  How to cite  | 

Abstract

Study design

Prospective observational study.

Purpose

This study was aimed to understand the risk factors of spine injuries, in the region of Northwest India.

Overview of literature

There had not been many studies on epidemiology of spine injury in this part of world. Western studies have documented their own risk factors which are becoming beneficial for them to reduce the incidence of this problem.

Materials and methods

Spinal injury patients were analyzed with focus on patient-related data including age, gender, regional distribution, injury mechanism, vehicle in Road traffic accident, vertebral level involved, concurrent cord injury, other bodily injury and socioeconomic status of the patient.

Results

Total 5,726 trauma patients were included in the study, in which 355 (6.19%) patients were found to be having spine injuries. Male:female ratio was 4.5:1. Mean age was 38.14. Most injuries occurred in the rural population (69.3%), and fall from height > 2 m (43.4%) constituted the most common mode of injury. Mode of injury showed no correlation with any particular spinal level involved; neither had it showed any correlation with age. Cervical was the most common level (45%). The study did not show predilection for any gender to have cord injury in a spinal injury patient (p = 0.006). Head injury was the most common associated injury (43.3%). All injuries were more common in low socioeconomic status group.

Conclusion

Impetus should be toward rural areas and low socioeconomic group for prevention and better management of spine injuries in Northwest India.

How to cite this article

Bajaj J, Mittal RS, Sharma A. Epidemiology of Spinal Injuries: An Experience in Tertiary and Regional Referral Hospital of Northwest India. J Spinal Surg 2014;1(3):111-114.

6,356

RESEARCH ARTICLE

Orientation of C1-2 Joints in Congenital Atlantoaxial Dislocation

[Year:2014] [Month:July-September] [Volume:1] [Number:3] [Pages:6] [Pages No:115 - 120]

   DOI: 10.5005/jp-journals-10039-1025  |  Open Access |  How to cite  | 

Abstract

Aim

To study the C1-2 facets in patients with congenital atlantoaxial dislocation and their bearing on the presentation and management.

Materials and methods

Thirty-six patients of congenital AAD were studied in the last 2 years. Twenty-four patients had irreducible AAD (not reducing on traction) and remaining 12 had reducible AAD. Computed tomography (CT) scans were obtained and the C1-2 joints were studied in axial, sagittal and coronal planes. The obliquity of (C1-2) joints was measured using the novel inferior C1 coronal and sagittal angles. The relationship of obliquity of joints, age and reducibility was studied and these were compared with normal subjects. The amount of facet to be drilled was decided by these angles. Direct posterior reduction was attempted by drilling the facets flat in all. Anomalous vertebral arteries (VA) were detected with preoperative CT angiograms and addressed appropriately intraoperatively.

Results

The inferior C1 sagittal and coronal angles were significantly acute in patients with IrAAD as compared to those with RAAD and normal spine. An inferior sagittal angle more than 150° predicted reducibility. More acute the angle, younger was the age of presentation. Relatively acute coronal angles were noticed in patients with telescoping (central or vertical dislocation). Intraoperative reduction could be achieved after drilling the facets nearly flat. Anomalous VA were found in over 70% of the patients with CAAD and were appropriately addressed. The fusion rates were over 90%.

Conclusion

The congenital AAD appears to be a dynamic process, progressing with time. The acuteness of the inferior C1 sagittal facet angles possibly determines the age at presentation and reducibility. Coronal angle determines the telescoping of C2 within C1. Intraoperative reduction through a direct posterior approach can be achieved in patients with IrAAD by drilling the wedge of C1-2 facets to make the joints relatively flat. Comprehensive facetal drilling also increases the fusion rates.

How to cite this article

Salunke P. Orientation of C1-2 Joints in Congenital Atlantoaxial Dislocation. J Spinal Surg 2014;1(3): 115-120.

2,405

RESEARCH ARTICLE

S Balaji Pai

Recurrent Lumbar Disk Herniation

[Year:2014] [Month:July-September] [Volume:1] [Number:3] [Pages:2] [Pages No:121 - 122]

   DOI: 10.5005/jp-journals-10039-1026  |  Open Access |  How to cite  | 

Abstract

How to cite this article

Pai SB. Recurrent Lumbar Disk Herniation. J Spinal Surg 2014;1(3):121-122.

3,223

CASE REPORT

S Syed Ali, P Dhivya, M Balamurugan

Hirayama Disease–Dynamic Cervical Compressive Myelopathy: An Indian Perspective

[Year:2014] [Month:July-September] [Volume:1] [Number:3] [Pages:3] [Pages No:123 - 125]

   DOI: 10.5005/jp-journals-10039-1027  |  Open Access |  How to cite  | 

Abstract

Introduction

Hirayama disease is a rare form of dynamic cervical flexion myelopathy. The incidence is more in Asian countries, like Japan, India, etc. Early diagnosis and treatment is the mainstay for the prognosis for this disease.

Materials and methods

Our aim is to assess the outcome of anterior cervical stabilization in this disease. We had six patients who was diagnosed to have Hirayama disease in our center and underwent anterior cervical stabilization.

Results

All six patients had fair to good outcome according to Odom's criteria.

Conclusion

Early diagnosis and prompt treatment is the mainstay for better outcome. Mode of treatment depends on surgeons preference.

How to cite this article

Ali SS, Dhivya P, Balamurugan M. Hirayama Disease–Dynamic Cervical Compressive Myelopathy: An Indian Perspective. J Spinal Surg 2014;1(3):123-125.

3,552

CASE REPORT

Jay Shah, Vinod Agrawal, Himanshu Parmar, Munjal Satishkumar Shah, Saurav N Nanda

Monocular Blindness due to Central Retinal Artery Occlusion Post Spine Surgery

[Year:2014] [Month:July-September] [Volume:1] [Number:3] [Pages:2] [Pages No:126 - 127]

   DOI: 10.5005/jp-journals-10039-1028  |  Open Access |  How to cite  | 

Abstract

How to cite this article

Agrawal V, Shah MS, Parmar H, Nanda SN, Shah J. Monocular Blindness due to Central Retinal Artery Occlusion Post Spine Surgery. J Spinal Surg 2014;1(3):126-127.

2,545

CASE REPORT

KL Suresh Kumar

Primary Cervical Intramedullary Spinal Cord Melanoma

[Year:2014] [Month:July-September] [Volume:1] [Number:3] [Pages:4] [Pages No:128 - 131]

   DOI: 10.5005/jp-journals-10039-1029  |  Open Access |  How to cite  | 

Abstract

Introduction

Primary central nervous system (CNS) melanoma is a rare condition that accounts for only 1% of all melanomas. Primary spinal cord melanoma is even rarer. The first case of spinal cord melanoma was reported by Hirschberg in 1906 and since then only 62 cases have been reported. Intramedullary spinal cord melanoma, as one described here, is extremely rare and cervical location is still rarer in occurrence.

Case report

A 27-year-old male presented with history of neck pain. On examination, he had sensory impairment on the nape of neck with no other deficits.

Investigation

Spinal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) shows intramedullary tumor C1-C2 region which is hyperintense on T1 and T2 with moderate enhancement.

Treatment

C1-C2 was done. Tumor was completely excised and diagnosed as melanoma.

Results

No metastatic lesion was found elsewhere. On 1 year follow-up after surgery, patient is doing well with no evidence of recurrence.

Conclusion

We present the details of a rare case of primary intramedullary spinal cord melanoma in cervical location which was completely resected.

How to cite this article

Gopal VV, Kumar KLS. Primary Cervical Intramedullary Spinal Cord Melanoma. J Spinal Surg 2014;1(3): 128-131.

4,171

CASE REPORT

Claudia Marcela Restrepo, Erik Muñoz, Juan David Cano, Andres Garay, Andreina Martinez Amado

A Rare Case of Caudal Regression Syndrome linked to Tethered Cord and Dermal Cysts

[Year:2014] [Month:July-September] [Volume:1] [Number:3] [Pages:3] [Pages No:132 - 134]

   DOI: 10.5005/jp-journals-10039-1030  |  Open Access |  How to cite  | 

Abstract

How to cite this article

Restrepo CM, Muñoz E, Cano JD, Garay A, Amado AM. A Rare Case of Caudal Regression Syndrome linked to Tethered Cord and Dermal Cysts. J Spinal Surg 2014;1(3):132-134.

5,080

CASE REPORT

Apoorva Pauranik, Rakesh Gupta, Rahul Awasthi

Salmonella Vertebral Osteomyelitis of Thoracic Spine

[Year:2014] [Month:July-September] [Volume:1] [Number:3] [Pages:3] [Pages No:135 - 137]

   DOI: 10.5005/jp-journals-10039-1031  |  Open Access |  How to cite  | 

Abstract

How to cite this article

Gupta R, Awasthi R, Pauranik A. Salmonella Vertebral Osteomyelitis of Thoracic Spine. J Spinal Surg 2014;1(3):135-137.

2,171

CASE REPORT

Premanand Ramani, I Sabri Ibrahim

Major Spinal Surgery Procedure on a High Cardiovascular Risk Patient with Symptomatic Neural Compression due to 1: Osteoporotic T12 Compression Fracture along with 2–L5/S1 Spondylolisthesis

[Year:2014] [Month:July-September] [Volume:1] [Number:3] [Pages:3] [Pages No:138 - 140]

   DOI: 10.5005/jp-journals-10039-1032  |  Open Access |  How to cite  | 

Abstract

Introduction

Osteoporotic vertebral fracture most common located at thoracolumbar junction, whereas most spondylolisthesis at L4-5 is six to 10 times more frequent involved than adjacent level. Concomitant compressed fracture with lumbar spondylolisthesis is rarely reported.

Aim

To report an unusual case concomitant osteoporotic compressed thoracic fracture with lumbar spondylolisthesis and severe comorbidity.

Case

A 68 years old female complaining 3 months severe low back pain and right thigh pain after falling on the floor. On physical examination, she had bilateral foot drop, there was no sensory loss and neither any bowel and bladder involvement with cardiovascular problem 70% left artery coronary obstruction on cardiac angiography.

Investigation

Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) D12 compression fracture with spinal cord and thecal sac compression and spondylolisthesis L5-S1.

Management

L5 laminectomy, L4/5 and S1 posterior stabilization, D-12 laminectomy and transpedicular vertebroplasty and posterior stabilization of D11-L1.

Result

The pain was significantly reduced after the surgery.

Conclusion

Open surgery among osteoporotic compression fracture in thoracic spine and degenerative spondylolisthesis in lumbar spine needs further evaluation regarding comorbid disease which often present in advancing age.

How to cite this article

Pawar SG, Ramani P, Ibrahim IS. Major Spinal Surgery Procedure on a High Cardiovascular Risk Patient with Symptomatic Neural Compression due to 1: Osteoporotic T12 Compression Fracture along with 2–L5/S1 Spondylolisthesis. J Spinal Surg 2014;1(3):138-140.

4,242

RESEARCH ARTICLE

S Shanthanam

Uterus Sign in Lumbar Spine

[Year:2014] [Month:July-September] [Volume:1] [Number:3] [Pages:3] [Pages No:141 - 143]

   DOI: 10.5005/jp-journals-10039-1033  |  Open Access |  How to cite  | 

Abstract

How to cite this article

Parthiban JKBC, Shanthanam S. Uterus Sign in Lumbar Spine. J Spinal Surg 2014;1(3):141-143.

729

RESEARCH ARTICLE

Vasudevan

The Great Neurosurgeon and Spinal Surgery

[Year:2014] [Month:July-September] [Volume:1] [Number:3] [Pages:1] [Pages No:144 - 144]

   DOI: 10.5005/joss-1-3-144  |  Open Access |  How to cite  | 

385

RESEARCH ARTICLE

Ajit Shinto

Sacroiliitis demonstrated on a Dual Phase Bone Scan

[Year:2014] [Month:July-September] [Volume:1] [Number:3] [Pages:1] [Pages No:145 - 145]

   DOI: 10.5005/joss-1-3-145  |  Open Access |  How to cite  | 

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