close
 
Kindly fill the following details to proceed
 
Email-ID:
 
 
 
  close
 
Email-Id validation link sent successfully to your registered email address, please click on link given in for validate your email-id.
 
 

Access Statistics 2015 | July-June | Issue 1

 

Review Article
Michael A Gallizzi MD MS, Lindsay T Kleeman MD, Daniel J Blizzard MD MS, Melissa M Erickson MD

Current Trends in the Management of Lumbar Spine Injuries in Athletes

[Year:2015] [Month:July-June] [Volumn:5 ] [Number:1] [Pages:72] [Pages No:63-67]


ABSTRACT

Lumbar spine injuries are prevalent among athletes and are likely to increase with the rising popularity of extreme sports. It is important for physicians to understand the basic anatomy of the lumbar spine along with the injury patterns that can occur with axial loading, hyperflexion and flexion-distraction forces. The majority of low back injuries in athletes are due to muscle strains and rarely need further treatment. Athletes that are subjected to repetitive hyperextension forces are at risk for spondylolysis with or without spondylolisthesis which requires further imaging to determine need for surgical intervention. Lumbar disk herniations are usually from axial forces and can be result in surgical emergencies, if they cause compression on the spinal cord or conus. Lumbar spine fractures can vary from stress fractures of the endplates to burst fractures or fracturedislocations which require surgical intervention, if associated with neurologic deficit or instability. Similar to the management of cervical spine injuries, patients with a suspected lumbar injury should be evaluated systematically with full spine precautions and careful neurologic examination to determine need for transfer to higher care center.

Keywords: Athlete, Lumbar, Lumbar spine, Sports, Sports injury, Management.

Gallizzi MA, Kleeman LT, Blizzard DJ, Erickson MM. Current Trends in the Management of Lumbar Spine Injuries in Athletes. The Duke Orthop J 2015;5(1):63-67.

Source of support: Nil

Conflict of interest: None

4537

Technical Report
Glenn Shi MD, Christopher E Gross MD, Jeannie Huh MD MSc, Selene G Parekh MD MBA

Pantalar Arthrodesis: Surgical Technique and Review of Literature

[Year:2015] [Month:July-June] [Volumn:5 ] [Number:1] [Pages:72] [Pages No:48-52]


ABSTRACT

Surgical options for treatment of tibiotalar, subtalar, and transverse tarsal joint arthritis are limited. Pantalar arthrodesis can produce a stable and braceable if not painless foot in the plantigrade position. This article presents a review of etiology, clinical evaluation, procedural technique and outcomes reported in literature.

Keywords: Pantalar, Arthrodesis, Fusion, Technique.

Shi G, Gross CE, Huh J, Parekh SG. Pantalar Arthrodesis: Surgical Technique and Review of Literature. The Duke Orthop J 2015;5(1):48-52.

Source of support: Nil

Conflict of interest: None

3368

Review Article
Lindsay T Kleeman MD, Michael A Gallizzi MD MS, Daniel J Blizzard MD MS, Melissa M Erickson MD

Cervical Spine Injuries in Sports

[Year:2015] [Month:July-June] [Volumn:5 ] [Number:1] [Pages:72] [Pages No:58-62]


ABSTRACT

Injuries to the cervical spine in athletes are rare but potentially devastating outcomes resulting from involvement in sports activities. New rules and regulations implemented by national sports organizations have helped to decrease the rate of cervical spine and spinal cord injuries sustained by athletes. A basic understanding of cervical spine anatomy, physical examination and spine precautions is necessary for any physician evaluating athletes on the field to determine if transfer to higher level of care is needed. It is particularly important to know the systematic protocol for spine immobilization, neurologic exam and helmet removal in a patient with a suspected cervical spine injury. While cervical strain is the most common cervical spine injury, physicians should be familiar with the presentation for other injuries, such as Burner’s syndrome (Stinger), cervical disk herniation, transient quadriplegia and cervical spine fractures or dislocations. Special consideration is needed when evaluating patients with Down syndrome as they are at higher risk for atlantoaxial instability. Determination of when an athlete can return to play is patient-specific with early return to play allowed only in a completely asymptomatic patient.

Keywords: Athlete, Cervical, Cervical spine, Sports, Sports injury, Management.

Kleeman LT, Gallizzi MA, Blizzard DJ, Erickson MM. Cervical Spine Injuries in Sports. The Duke Orthop J 2015;5(1):58-62.

Source of support: Nil

Conflict of interest: None

2846

Special Interest Article
Elizabeth W Hubbard MD, Mitchell R Klement MD

Tribute to Dr William T Hardaker Jr

[Year:2015] [Month:July-June] [Volumn:5 ] [Number:1] [Pages:72] [Pages No:xvii-xix]


ABSTRACT

Dr William T Hardaker Jr, MD, was born in December 24, 1941, in Charleston, South Carolina, to parents, William Hardaker Sr and Gale Angas Hardaker. He demonstrated tremendous leadership, dedication and commitment to his activities early on, rising to the rank of Eagle Scout. These qualities also allowed him to excel both academically and athletically where he went on to pursue BA in Political Science from the University of Pennsylvania. At Penn, he was both an active member of the Reserve Officers’ Training Corps (ROTC) and was a 4 years starter on the football team. He was elected as a team captain in his senior year and graduated in 1963.

2817

Review Article
Tyler Vovos MS, Daniel J Blizzard MD MS, Grant Garrigues MD

Management of Terrible Triad Injuries of the Elbow

[Year:2015] [Month:July-June] [Volumn:5 ] [Number:1] [Pages:72] [Pages No:28-34]


ABSTRACT

The term ‘Terrible Triad’ was initially coined by Hotchkiss et al to describe fracture-dislocations of the elbow involving three specific injuries: a posterolateral dislocation, coronoid fracture and radial head fracture.1 Fracture-dislocations of this type are notoriously unstable secondary to loss of the anterior buttress support from the coronoid, valgus support from the radial head, and the posterolateral stabilization of the lateral ulnar collateral ligament (LUCL).2,3 Furthermore, these injury patterns are particularly difficult to treat and have resulted in poor functional outcomes including the need for multiple reoperations.4-6
Herein, the pathoanatomy, classification, diagnosis and management of these challenging injuries will be discussed.

Keywords: Terrible triad elbow, Collateral ligaments, Dislocations, Fractures, Elbow, Elbow joint, Radius, Radius fractures, Coronoid, Coronoid fractures.

Vovos T, Blizzard DJ, Garrigues G. Management of Terrible Triad Injuries of the Elbow. The Duke Orthop J 2015;5(1): 28-34.

Source of support: Nil

Conflict of interest: None

1858

Review Article
Jason M Jennings MD DPT, Douglas A Dennis MD

Wound Issues after Total Knee Arthroplasty

[Year:2015] [Month:July-June] [Volumn:5 ] [Number:1] [Pages:72] [Pages No:10-13]


ABSTRACT

Wound healing problems following total knee arthroplasty (TKA) are infrequent, but if present may lead to devastating results. Occurrence may be minimized by modifying patient risk factors, proper selection of skin incisions, and using operative techniques that protect soft tissues. When wound complications arise, prompt management is imperative to assure the best outcome after TKA.

Keywords: Total knee arthroplasty, Wound healing, Wound complications.

Jennings JM, Dennis DA. Wound Issues after Total Knee Arthroplasty. The Duke Orthop J 2015;5(1):10-13.

Source of support: Nil

Conflict of interest: None

1589

Clinical Studies
SK Venkatesh Gupta MS, Pradeep Mandapalli MS

Comparative Study between Bridging External Fixation vs Volar Plating (Ellis-T Plate) for Comminuted Fracture of the Distal End Radius

[Year:2015] [Month:July-June] [Volumn:5 ] [Number:1] [Pages:72] [Pages No:20-24]


ABSTRACT

Background: The purpose of this study is to compare between the open reduction and internal fixation (ORIF) using a volar plate and external fixation with K-wire fixation for the treatment of unstable distal radius fractures.

Materials and methods: This investigation was designed to prospectively evaluate the outcomes of similar distal radius fracture patterns treated by ORIF with volar plating vs closed reduction and pinning with external fixation.

Results: Open reduction and internal fixation with volar locking plate group has overall decrease incidence of complications significantly less radial shortening and significantly greater postoperative wrist motion when compared to external fixation.

Conclusion: Use of volar locking plate resulted in a faster recovery of function compared with external fixation. Use of volar locking plate resulted in better anatomical function and grip strength. However, no functional advantage was demonstrated at or beyond 12 weeks or 1 year.

Keywords: Distal radius fracture, Volar plating, External fixation, K-wire, Comminuted.

Gupta SKV, Mandapalli P. Comparative Study between Bridging External Fixation vs Volar Plating (Ellis-T Plate) for Comminuted Fracture of the Distal End Radius. The Duke Orthop J 2015;5(1):20-24.

Source of support: Nil

Conflict of interest: None

1515

Review Article
Samuel B Adams Jr MD, Christopher E Gross MD, David M Tainter MD, Mark E Easley MD, Selene G Parekh MD MBA

Surgical Management of Osteochondral Lesions of the Talus

[Year:2015] [Month:July-June] [Volumn:5 ] [Number:1] [Pages:72] [Pages No:35-47]


ABSTRACT

Osteochondral lesions of the talus (OLT) present a formidable treatment challenge to the orthopaedic surgeon. Historical cartilage repair strategies often result in the formation of fibrocartilage leading to suboptimal clinical results. With advances in regenerative medicine, modern surgical techniques are diverse and employ autograft, allograft and tissue-engineered constructs for cartilage repair. Fresh and particulated juvenile allograft transplantation have become popular options in the United States. Worldwide, both cellular and acellular tissue-engineered constructs are utilized. In all cases, there is still debate as to the optimal cell source and scaffold material and only shortterm clinical results are available. This article will review these current as well as experimental techniques for cartilage repair of osteochondral lesions of the talus.

Keywords: Talus, Osteochondral, Lesion, Osteochondritis dissecans, Microfracture, OLT, Allograft, OATS, PJCAT, ACI, MACI, AMIC, Metal resurfacing, Cartilage.

Adams Jr SB, Gross CE, Tainter DM, Easley ME, Parekh SG. Surgical Management of Osteochondral Lesions of the Talus. The Duke Orthop J 2015;5(1):35-47.

Source of support: Nil

Conflict of interest: None

1326

Case Report
Ankit Arunbhai Desai MD Ortho DNB, BL Chandrakar MS, Rakesh Thakkar MS, Rahul Peswani JR

Lipoma in Thenar Region

[Year:2015] [Month:July-June] [Volumn:5 ] [Number:1] [Pages:72] [Pages No:68-69]


ABSTRACT

Lipomas can be found anywhere in the body, with the majority being located in the head and neck region, as well as the back and abdomen. Lipomas are one of the most common benign, mesenchymal neoplasms. They may progress in size overtime and they may or may not be painful. They may be superficial or deep. Deep soft-tissue lipomas of the hand are rare. Among them, thenar intramuscular lipomas are very rare. We are reporting case of thenar intramuscular lipoma.

Keywords: Lipoma, Thenar, Intramuscular lipoma.

Desai AA, Chandrakar BL, Thakkar R, Peswani R. Lipoma in Thenar Region. The Duke Orthop J 2015;5(1):68-69.

Source of support: Nil

Conflict of interest: None

1267

Review Article
Vani Sabesan MD, Timothy R Jelsema MS, Daniel J Lombardo MD

Proper Postsurgical Pain Management in Orthopaedics: Reviewing the Efficacy of Wound Infiltration with Liposomal Bupivacaine (Exparel)

[Year:2015] [Month:July-June] [Volumn:5 ] [Number:1] [Pages:72] [Pages No:6-9]


ABSTRACT

Adequate postoperative pain management after an orthopaedic procedure is critical for patient well-being, acceptable clinical outcomes and patient satisfaction. Current literature suggests over 80% of surgical patients’ state they have moderate to severe pain within 24 hours postoperatively. The standard in pain management for more than 40 years has been opioids, medications known for their many adverse effects and limited efficacy. Recently, a multimodal approach to pain control has been sought after for optimal postoperative pain management. This approach utilizes multiple methods of pain management, such as nerve blocks, wound infiltration with local anesthetics and oral analgesics, to concomitantly reduce postoperative pain. Liposomal bupivacaine, EXPAREL, has been shown to reduce pain for as long as 96 hours postoperatively in select studies. These studies have included both hard and soft-tissue procedures. The goal of this review is to examine the literature on EXPAREL and provide a comprehensive presentation for orthopaedic surgeons to apply to their practices.

Keywords: EXPAREL, Bupivacaine, Liposomal, Orthopaedics, Postoperative management, Pain.

Sabesan V, Jelsema TR, Lombardo DJ. Proper Postsurgical Pain Management in Orthopaedics: Reviewing the Efficacy of Wound Infiltration with Liposomal Bupivacaine (EXPAREL ). The Duke Orthop J 2015;5(1):6-9.

Source of support: Nil

Conflict of interest: None

978

Clinical Study
Benjamin Matthew Wooster MD, Samuel Evan Carstensen MD, James E Johnson PhD, Allston Julius Stubbs MD MBA

Model Orthopaedic Surgical Skills Curriculum for Fourth Year Medical Students

[Year:2015] [Month:July-June] [Volumn:5 ] [Number:1] [Pages:72] [Pages No:1-5]


ABSTRACT

Musculoskeletal education in medical schools throughout the United States is inconsistent. Furthermore, formal surgical skill training in medical school is often lacking. Consequently, orthopaedic surgery residents in the United States are faced with a unique challenge as they transition from medical student to house officer in comparison to their peers pursuing more generalized specialties. In response, we designed and successfully implemented an innovative month long elective at Wake Forest University School of Medicine for fourth year medical students who were in the process of applying to orthopaedic surgery residency programs. This course provides medical students with an introduction to the basic skills and common surgical approaches that are commonly utilized early in orthopaedic surgery residency and beyond. While longitudinal data are needed, we believe this novel month long elective will allow the transition from medical student to house officer to be a smoother and more seamless process.

Keywords: Orthopaedic surgery, Curriculum development, Surgical skills.

Wooster BM, Carstensen SE, Johnson JE, Stubbs AJ. Model Orthopaedic Surgical Skills Curriculum for Fourth Year Medical Students. The Duke Orthop J 2015;5(1):1-5.

Source of support: Nil

Conflict of interest: Dr Allston Stubbs reports grants from Bauerfeind and Johnson and Johnson. He is a consultant for Smith and Nephew, Inc., and is a board or committee member with the International Society for Hip Arthroscopy, Journal of Arthroscopy, American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine and Arthroscopy Association of North America.
All other authors report no declarations of interest.

925

Clinical Studies
Jonathan A Godin MD MBA, Jack G Skendzel MD, Jon K Sekiya MD

Cost Analysis of Failed Shoulder Stabilization

[Year:2015] [Month:July-June] [Volumn:5 ] [Number:1] [Pages:72] [Pages No:14-19]


ABSTRACT

Background: Shoulder instability is a common problem, especially in the young, active population. Revision stabilization has a high rate of recurrent instability, low rates of return to play, and low clinical outcome scores. The challenge for surgeons is identifying the best surgery for each patient. To our knowledge, no studies have been published examining the cost of failed shoulder stabilization.

Hypothesis: The high cost of index and revision stabilization procedures in a cohort of patients with recurrent shoulder instability can be reduced through judicious preoperative planning and the use of more aggressive surgical techniques during the index operation.

Methods: We retrospectively reviewed the medical records and billing information of 18 consecutive patients treated at our institution for failed shoulder instability repairs during a 36-month period. Using the billing records for each case, a cost analysis was conducted from a societal perspective.

Results: The actual costs of index stabilization and revision stabilization procedures for our cohort of 18 patients amounted to $1,447,690. The costs of revision surgeries conducted for this cohort by a single surgeon at our institution amounted to $673,248. The hypothetical costs of primary arthroscopic stabilization and open stabilization for a cohort of 18 patients leading to permanent repair was $395,415 and $585,639 respectively. The incremental difference between actual costs and hypothetical costs of primary osteoarticular (OA) allograft stabilization for patients with bony defects is $278,394. For patients with significant bone defects, an open repair with failure rate of 44.9%, or an arthroscopic repair with failure rate of 62.8%, is cost neutral to a primary open repair with OA allograft. In addition, an open repair with failure rate of 13.0%, or an arthroscopic repair with failure rate of 41.3%, is cost neutral to a primary definitive repair.

Conclusion: Failed shoulder stabilization bears high costs to society, even without considering the psychological costs to patients. We must identify and refine diagnostic and prognostic factors to better determine the appropriate treatment modality for patients with primary shoulder instability.

Keywords: Cost, Analysis, Shoulder, Instability, Stabilization.

Godin JA, Skendzel JG, Sekiya JK. Cost Analysis of Failed Shoulder Stabilization. The Duke Orthop J 2015;5(1):14-19.

Source of support: Nil

Conflict of interest: None

860

Special Interest Article
James R Urbaniak MD

On the Shoulders of Giants: John P Adams MD

[Year:2015] [Month:July-June] [Volumn:5 ] [Number:1] [Pages:72] [Pages No:xx-xxi]


ABSTRACT

Intellectually, John Adams has one of the best recalls I have ever encountered. He has gained a position of leadership in American Orthopaedics in both teaching and administration, and he is respected throughout the specialty. During the coming years, he is destined to reap many honors. So, Dr Lenox Baker wrote about John Adams in May 30, 1965, in a reference letter. Dr Baker, our Duke Orthopaedic Chairman for more than 30 years (1937-1967), prided himself in judging character, and his appraisal of Dr Adams was certainly not an overstatement.

850

Clinical Studies
David C Holst MD, Allston J Stubbs MD, Phillip R Mason MD, Adam Anx MD, Brad Perry MS, Elizabeth A Howse MD

Correlation of Atraumatic Pain with Acetabular Chondromalacia in Athletes

[Year:2015] [Month:July-June] [Volumn:5 ] [Number:1] [Pages:72] [Pages No:25-27]


ABSTRACT

This study investigates the relationship of atraumatic, prearthritic hip pain to the severity of acetabular chondromalacia (CSI) documented at the time of hip arthroscopy in a group of athletes. Our hypothesis is that hip pain duration is positively correlated with acetabular cartilage damage. Forty-six consecutive patients with atraumatic, prearthritic hip pain underwent hip arthroscopy. The severity of chondral damage was compared to duration of symptoms, age, and Wiberg’s lateral center edge angle. For the cohort of male patients, the Pearson’s correlation coefficient was r = 0.43 for age (p = 0.049), r = 0.85 for pain duration (p < 0.001), and r = 0.13 for Wiberg angle (p = 0.573). These findings in the athletic, male cohort supports a positive correlation between duration of hip pain symptoms and degree of acetabular chondromalacia.

Keywords: Hip arthroscopy, Chondromalacia, Athlete, Atraumatic pain.

Holst DC, Stubbs AJ, Mason PR, Anx A, Perry B, Howse EA. Correlation of Atraumatic Pain with Acetabular Chondromalacia in Athletes. The Duke Orthop J 2015;5(1):25-27.

Source of support: Nil

Conflict of interest: None

783

Clinical Study
Michael A Gallizzi MD MS, Christine M Gagnon PhD, Daniel J Blizzard MD MS, Steven P Stanos DO

Failed Back Surgery Syndrome and Back Pain Patients: Medications They use and How They relate to Their Emotional and Physical Functioning

[Year:2015] [Month:July-June] [Volumn:5 ] [Number:1] [Pages:72] [Pages No:53-57]


ABSTRACT

Study Design: Retrospective analysis.

Objective: To test the hypothesis that failed back surgery syndrome (FBSS) patients and nonsurgical back pain (NSBP) patients respond differently on psychological measures and differ in pain medication usage.

Summary of background data: The study was part of an interdisciplinary outpatient functional restoration program. There were 121 participants-42 with FBSS and 79 with NSBP-who participated in a multidisciplinary pain evaluation.

Methods: A chart review was performed and interventions were not applicable. The outcome measures for the study include: the beck depression inventory (BDI), pain disability index (PDI), state-trait anxiety inventory (STAI), multidimensional pain inventory pain severity (MPI-PS) subscale and medication quantification scale III (MQS-III).

Results: Pearson’s correlation analyses of all patients combined (28 FBSS and 39 NSBP) revealed significant relationships between MQS-III and BDI (r = 0.388, p < 0.01) and STAI (r = 0.323, p < 0.05). A significant correlation was found between MQS-III and STAI (r = 0.536, p < 0.05) among the NSBP patients. The MQS-III was significantly correlated with BDI (r = 0.536, p < 0.05) and MPI-PS t-scores (r = 0.356, p < 0.05) among the 40 NSBP patients. Independent t-tests of mean BDI, PDI, STAI, MPI-PS, and MQS-III scores revealed no significant group differences.

Conclusion: Results suggest that while there is differing correlation between FBSS and NSBP groups in pain medication use and psychometrics, the mean difference of quantity of pain medications used and scores on psychometric measurements in these groups are not different. While presurgical psychometrics and pain medication usage were not available for our FBSS patients, our results support that medication quantification with psychological prescreening before surgical intervention for back pain patients may help to limit the number of failed back surgeries. Thus, future research including preand postsurgical psychological functioning, physical functioning, and pain medication usage is suggested.

Keywords: Lower back pain, Failed back surgery syndrome, Analgesic drugs, Psychological measures.

Gallizzi MA, Gagnon CM, Blizzard DJ, Stanos SP. Failed Back Surgery Syndrome and Back Pain Patients: Medications They use and How They relate to Their Emotional and Physical Functioning. The Duke Orthop J 2015;5(1):53-57.

Source of support: Nil

Conflict of interest: None

728

Case Report
Mathew D Crawford MD, William C Eward DVM MD

What is the Diagnosis?

[Year:2015] [Month:July-June] [Volumn:5 ] [Number:1] [Pages:72] [Pages No:70-72]


ABSTRACT

Melorheostosis is a rare, benign connective tissue disorder affecting both bone and soft tissues. Its insidious and variable presentation makes it a challenging clinical diagnosis. We describe the case of a patient presenting with monomelic involvement including significant contractures of the left upper extremity. This case illustrates the functional morbidity associated with melorheostosis as well as its characteristic (i.e. radiographs with flowing hyperostosis) and more rare (i.e. local gigantism) findings.

Keywords: Melorheostosis, Hyperostosis, Skeletal dysplasia.

Crawford MD, Eward WC. What is the Diagnosis? The Duke Orthop J 2015;5(1):70-72.

Source of support: Nil

Conflict of interest: None

712

Special Interest Article
Mitchell R Klement MD, Elizabeth W Hubbard MD

Feagin Leadership Forum Update

[Year:2015] [Month:July-June] [Volumn:5 ] [Number:1] [Pages:72] [Pages No:xxv-xxvi]


ABSTRACT

The John A Feagin Jr, MD, Leadership Program was established in 2009 in honor of Dr John A Feagin Jr, MD. For 6 years, the program has strived to cultivate leadership skills among the Duke medical students, orthopaedic residents and fellows. Scholars accepted into this program do so with the full understanding that they (they are) making a tremendous commitment of their time and energy. The program involves a 10-month curriculum including topics, such as ‘Defining personal leadership and values’ and ‘Mentoring’. Scholars are also involved in a 10-month long group project as well as numerous seminars, workshops and mentorship programs. The goal of this program is to prepare the next generation of leaders and it continues to grow under the leadership of Program Chairman COL (Ret) Dean Taylor, ME; Program Executive LTC (Ret) Joe Doty, PhD; Advisory Board President COL (Ret) Walt Curl, MD and Vice President Kathy M Andolsek, MD MPH.

664

Letter from the Editors
Daniel J Blizzard MD MS, Mitchell R Klement MD, Elizabeth W Hubbard MD

Letter from the Editors

[Year:2015] [Month:July-June] [Volumn:5 ] [Number:1] [Pages:72] [Pages No:xiii]


ABSTRACT

Dear Colleagues,
It is with great pleasure that we present the fifth edition of the Duke Orthopaedic Journal (DOJ). This has been a tremendous year for us and we are pleased to be able to publish a wide range of articles submitted from both our national and international associates. Many of our readers have inquired regarding if and when the journal would be indexed through PubMed. We have not yet gone forward with this change for a number of reasons. One major reason is that the journal’s founders and editors have taken pride in publishing what we feel is a unique record of the yearly changes and accomplishments of the Duke Orthopaedic Program and intend for the journal to be a source of new and interesting research.

596

Letter from the Chairman
Benjamin Alman MD FRCSC

Letter from the Chairman

[Year:2015] [Month:July-June] [Volumn:5 ] [Number:1] [Pages:72] [Pages No:xv-xvi]


ABSTRACT

THE FUTURE OF DUKE ORTHOPAEDICS: DEVELOPING A CULTURE FOR SUCCESS

Academic orthopaedic departments have a special challenge to develop and maintain three core missions: To provide an exceptional level of patient-centered musculoskeletal care, to generate and use new knowledge to improve the care of people with musculoskeletal conditions, and to educate and train the next generation of musculoskeletal providers and the leaders of orthopaedic surgery tomorrow. Exceptional performance in any one core mission is a reason to celebrate. Our department reached an important milestone this year in demonstrating exceptional performance in its tripartite clinical, research and education mission. The department ranked 9th in the US News and World Report for clinical care, 6th in NIH funding for an orthopaedic department, and 5th in the inaugural Doximity/US News and World Report Residency rankings. This makes Duke orthopaedics the only department ranked 9th or better in all three of these indices. This is an important accomplishment, something that recognizes the incredible quality, dedication, and depth of the Duke faculty, trainees and staff.

577

Special Interest Article
Norah Foster MD

The 2015 Parekh Indo-US Foot and Ankle Surgery Annual Meeting Experience (Indian Adventures)

[Year:2015] [Month:July-June] [Volumn:5 ] [Number:1] [Pages:72] [Pages No:xxviii-xxx]


ABSTRACT

The next time you think our duty hours are strict, know that we have it better than the airlines! What started as a very bumpy ride (literally) to India that was wrought with crew hours restrictions, flight delays, innocently walking out of an airport and almost not being let back in, and lost baggage, ended up in a unique experience that was both meaningful and inspirational.

577

Special Interest Article
Cameron Ledford MD

Piedmont Orthopaedic Meeting Update (2014)

[Year:2015] [Month:July-June] [Volumn:5 ] [Number:1] [Pages:72] [Pages No:xxvii]


ABSTRACT

The 62nd Annual Orthopaedic Piedmont meeting marked a new milestone for our society by taking place in one of the world’s oldest and most influential cultures: Greece. This historical meeting (first one outside of the US except for Bermuda and St John’s, Virgin Islands) was attended by 85 members along with spouses, guests, and children totaling 210+. Current residents who attended the meeting included: William Mook, recipient of the John M Harrelson, Chief Resident Teaching Award, Cameron Ledford and John Lewis, recipients of the Ralph Coonrad Pediatric Orthopaedics Traveling Fellowships, and Matthew Tao, recipient of the William S Ogden, Junior Resident Award. The meeting provided education on current orthopaedic topics, Greek history and culture, and great fun for all ages.

554

Special Interest Article
Elizabeth W Hubbard MD

Emily Berend Adult Reconstruction Symposium (2014)

[Year:2015] [Month:July-June] [Volumn:5 ] [Number:1] [Pages:72] [Pages No:xxxi-xxxii]


ABSTRACT

The Emily Berend Adult Reconstruction Symposia (EBARS) celebrated its 6th year at Duke University in April 25 and 26, 2014. Drs Michael (Duke Med ‘92; Ortho ‘98) and Keith (Duke Med ‘97; Ortho ‘02) Berend once again sponsored the educational symposia in honor of their late mother Emily. This 2-day educational event is designed to educate adult reconstruction surgeons as well as orthopaedic residents, fellows, allied health professionals and nurses about the most research changes in research and practice in adult reconstruction.

528

Letter from the Faculty Advisor
Selene G Parekh MD MBA

Letter from the Faculty Advisor

[Year:2015] [Month:July-June] [Volumn:5 ] [Number:1] [Pages:72] [Pages No:xiv]


ABSTRACT

It gives me great pleasure to present the fifth issue of the Duke Orthopaedic Journal (DOJ). This year marks the 5 years anniversary of the journal. As we have grown, the journal continues to find its place in the tradition of Duke orthopaedics.

499

Special Interest Article
Mitchell R Klement MD, Elizabeth W Hubbard MD

Faculty Teaching Award

[Year:2015] [Month:July-June] [Volumn:5 ] [Number:1] [Pages:72] [Pages No:xxiii-xxiv]


ABSTRACT

Each year, the graduating chief resident class reflects on the faculty and chooses a faculty member who has made a tremendous impact on each resident’s education and training while at Duke. It is an extraordinarily difficult decision as we have an incredible faculty. Last year, the chief residents selected Dr James A Nunley II.

474

Special Interest Article
Daniel J Blizzard MD MS, Elizabeth W Hubbard MD

Resident Awards

[Year:2015] [Month:July-June] [Volumn:5 ] [Number:1] [Pages:72] [Pages No:xxii]


ABSTRACT

William S Ogden, Jr Piedmont Traveling Fellowship Award

Every year, the chief residents review the third year class and choose a resident who they believe best represents dedication to the residency program, compassion toward fellow residents and patients, and leadership and professionalism during orthopaedic training. Last year, Dr Matthew Tao was selected by the chief class of 2014 as the recipient of the William S Ogden, Jr Piedmont Traveling Fellowship Award. Dr Tao was nominated for commitment and hard work that he demonstrated to the chief class throughout the year. He will be pursuing a fellowship in sports medicine and has been extremely active in research within the field of sports medicine throughout residency. While attending the Piedmont Annual Meeting in Greece, he presented a talk on post-traumatic osteonecrosis of the humeral head. He went on to the Eastern Orthopaedic Association Annual Meeting to present both on pediatric shoulder dislocation as well as a talk on how resident education is evolving, entitled ‘Transforming resident education-a new horizon for orthopaedic skills training.’

416



© JAYPEE BROTHERS MEDICAL PUBLISHERS (P) LTD.