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Access Statistics 2014 | July-June | Issue 1

 

Case Report
Amit Agrawal

Spinal Cord Contusion and Quadriplegia in a Patient with Klippel-Feil Anomaly

[Year:2014] [Month:July-June] [Volumn:4 ] [Number:1] [Pages:32] [Pages No:1-2]


ABSTRACT

Keywords: Cervical cord contusion, Klippel-Feil anomaly, Minor trauma, Klippel-Feil syndrome.

How to cite this article: Agrawal A. Spinal Cord Contusion and Quadriplegia in a Patient with Klippel-Feil Anomaly. The Duke Orthop J 2014;4(1):1-2.

Source of support: Nil

Conflict of interest: None

2831

Original Research
Pier Francesco Indelli MD PhD, Andrea Baldini MD, Luca Manfredini PT, Massimiliano Marcucci MD

Rotational Alignment Landmarks in Primary Total Knee Arthroplasty

[Year:2014] [Month:July-June] [Volumn:4 ] [Number:1] [Pages:32] [Pages No:8-12]


ABSTRACT

Purpose: We hypothesized that the anterior tibial surface curvature is a more reliable landmark for correct tibial component rotational positioning in TKA respect to the ‘Akagi’ line and the medial third of the tibial tubercle.

Methods: Three independent investigators reviewed 124 knee MRI scans, identifying independently the femoral transepicondylar axis (TEA), the femoral posterior condylar axis (PCA), a line connecting the middle of the posterior cruciate ligament and the medial edge of the patellar tendon attachment (Akagi’s line), the medial third of the tibial tubercle and the anterior tibial surface curvature. The most appropriate tibial baseplate tracing for the NexGen Total Knee System (Zimmer, Warsaw, USA) was superimposed matching the anterior tibial cortex with its anterior surface. At this point, the rotation of the tibial plate tracing was calculated in respect to the TEA, the medial third of the tibial tubercle line, the Akagi’s line and the PCA. Customized software was created and used for analysis of the MRI datasets.

Results: The investigators agreed on the localization of the Akagi’s line in 64% of the cases within 3° and in 85% of the cases within 5° (minimum -16°, maximum -7°): this landmark might lead to internal rotation of the tibial component. The observers agreed on the localization of the medial third of the tibial tubercle in 29% of the cases within 3° and, in 70% of the cases, within 5° (minimum -4°, maximum +4°): this landmark might lead to external rotation of the tibial component. The investigators agreed on the localization of the anterior tibial surface curvature in 89% of the cases within 3° and in 99% of the cases within 5° (minimum -1°, maximum +4°): component alignment along the anterior cortex guaranteed full matching ±3° to the epicondylar axis in 75% of the knees.

Conclusion: Alignment of the tibial component, when based on the anterior tibial surface, was more reliable and easier identifiable than either the Akagi’s line or the medial third of the tibial tubercle.

Level of evidence: Level 3 (Retrospective cohort study).

Keywords: TKA, Alignment, Bone landmarks, MRI.

How to cite this article: Indelli PF, Baldini A, Manfredini L, Marcucci M. Rotational Alignment Landmarks in Primary Total Knee Arthroplasty. The Duke Orthop J 2014;4(1):8-12.

Source of support: Nil

Conflict of interest: None

2313

Special Interest Article
Jonathan A Godin

AAOS/ORS Annual Meeting Update

[Year:2014] [Month:July-June] [Volumn:4 ] [Number:1] [Pages:32] [Pages No:xxx-xxxiii]


ABSTRACT

The Duke Department of Orthopaedic Surgery had a proud showing at both the 2014 Orthopaedic Research Society (ORS) annual meeting held, March 15th to 18th, 2014 in New Orleans, Louisiana, as well as the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS) annual meeting held, March 11th to 15th, 2014 in New Orleans, Louisiana. Many members of the Duke Orthopaedic Surgery family were able to gather for the Piedmont Orthopedic Society Mid-Winter reception at the Sheraton New Orleans Hotel on Friday, March 14th. Listed below is a summary of the podium presentations, posters, demonstrations, and invited lectures from the current faculty and residents at these meetings.

2004

Case Series
Richard J Nasca MD

Adhesive Capsulitis of the Shoulder in Patients with Diabetes

[Year:2014] [Month:July-June] [Volumn:4 ] [Number:1] [Pages:32] [Pages No:24-26]


ABSTRACT

Background: Adhesive capsulitis of the shoulder is common in patients with diabetes. The exact etiology is unknown. The aim of this study is to evaluate the results of subacromial bursal corticosteroid injections and a home program of Codman’s exercises in a cohort of diabetic patients with adhesive capsulitis.

Materials and methods: Twelve diabetic patients with adhesive capsulitis treated from November, 2011 to February, 2013 in an outpatient clinic were evaluated. The age range was 40 to 64 years with a mean age of 52. There were six males and six females. Six patients had involvement of the right shoulder, four had involvement of the left and two patients had bilateral shoulder involvement. The dominate upper extremity was affected in nine patients. There were 11 patients with type 2 diabetes and one with type 1 diabetes. All patients had an insidious onset of pain and stiffness in the affected shoulder. There was poorly localized tenderness about the shoulder with restricted abduction, forward flexion and internal rotation limited to the level of the buttocks or below. There were abnormal imaging studies in seven of the 12 patients. Five patients did not have imaging studies. Edema and thickening of rotator cuff tissue was the most frequent finding on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). There was one small rotator cuff tear and one small labral tear. Patients were treated with a subacromial bursal space injection with 2 to 3 ml of 2% lidocaine and one milliliter of betamethasone sodium phosphate and sodium acetate (6 mg/ ml). Following the injection, passive stretching of the involved shoulder was done for a few minutes. The patients were instructed in Codman’s exercises and wall climbing.

Results: Good pain relief was experienced by 11 patients with only fair relief in one. The average range of motion posttreatment was greater than 110° forward flexion and greater than 140° abduction. Internal rotation was possible to the L3 level. Two patients had a recurrence of symptoms at 6 and 12 months, and both were treated with reinjection and subsequent symptomatic improvement. There were no complications, though some patients had a transient rise in their blood sugar following injection.

Conclusion: Subacromial bursal injections coupled with Codman’s exercises are effective in treating adhesive capsulitis of the shoulder in diabetic patients.

Keywords: Diabetic, Adhesive capsulitis, Subacromial injection.

Level of evidence: IV

How to cite this article: Nasca RJ. Adhesive Capsulitis of the Shoulder in Patients with Diabetes. The Duke Orthop J 2014;4(1):24-26.

Source of support: Nil

Conflict of interest: None

1781

Special Interest Article
Elizabeth W Hubbard MD, Lou Ogden

On the Shoulders of Giants: William S Ogden MD

[Year:2014] [Month:July-June] [Volumn:4 ] [Number:1] [Pages:32] [Pages No:xviii-xix]


ABSTRACT

While there have been several accomplished graduates from the Duke Orthopaedic Residency Program, few of them have made as strong and direct an impact on the residency program as Dr William Singleton Ogden.

1711

Case Series
Selene Parekh MD, Todd Bertrand MD, Robert Zura MD, Samuel Adams MD, Alan Yan MD

Novel Techniques in Treating Calcaneal Tuberosity Fractures

[Year:2014] [Month:July-June] [Volumn:4 ] [Number:1] [Pages:32] [Pages No:3-7]


ABSTRACT

Calcaneal tuberosity fractures comprise only 1 to 2% of all calcaneal fractures. Treatment of these injuries has traditionally included open reduction and internal fixation with various means including lag screws, suture anchors and K-wires. We report on a series of cases treated with excision of the tuberosity fragment with repair of the Achilles tendon supplemented by a flexor hallucis longus tendon transfer.

Keywords: Calcaneus, Tuberosity, Fracture, Achilles, Flexor hallucis longus.

How to cite this article: Parekh S, Bertrand T, Zura R, Adams S, Yan A. Novel Techniques in Treating Calcaneal Tuberosity Fractures. The Duke Orthop J 2014;4(1):3-7.

Source of support: Nil

Conflict of interest: None

1710

Special Interest Article
Julie A Neumann MD, Kathryne J Stabile MD, Ann H Taylor BSN, Col (retired) Dean, C Taylor MD

John A Feagin Jr MD Leadership Program Update

[Year:2014] [Month:July-June] [Volumn:4 ] [Number:1] [Pages:32] [Pages No:xxv-xxvii]


ABSTRACT

This year marks the 5th year of the Duke Sports Medicine Feagin Leadership Program, created in honor of COL (Ret) John A Feagin Jr, MD, Duke University Emeritus Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery and graduate of United States Military Academy at West Point in 1955. This program continues to attract bright and highly motivated individuals from across the Duke Medical community interested in cultivating leadership skills. Throughout the academic year the Feagin Leadership faculty and scholars participate in seminars, workshops, conferences, and mentorship opportunities on various leadership principles and development initiatives. The goal of the program is to prepare the scholars to assume leadership positions in their respective medical professions and communities.

1410

Original Research
Cameron K Ledford MD, Alexander R Vap MD, Michael P Bolognesi MD, Samuel S Wellman MD

Total Hip Arthroplasty in Very Young Bone Marrow Transplant Patients

[Year:2014] [Month:July-June] [Volumn:4 ] [Number:1] [Pages:32] [Pages No:19-23]


ABSTRACT

Concerns remain about total hip arthroplasty (THA) performed in very young patients, especially those with complex medical history such as allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (ABMT). This study retrospectively reviews the perioperative courses and functional outcomes of ABMT patients <21 years old undergoing primary uncemented THA. Nine THAs were performed in five ABMT patients at an average age of 19.7 years. The interval between ABMT and THA was 73.0 months with clinical follow-up of 25.8 months. Harris Hip Scores (HHS) increased dramatically from preoperatively 44.5 (31.1-53.4) to postoperatively 85.2 (72.0-96.0) and all patients subjectively reported a good (4 hips) to excellent (5 hips) overall outcome. There was one reoperation for periprosthetic fracture fixation but there were no infections or revisions performed. Despite the history of severe hematopoietic conditions requiring ABMT, these very young patients do appear to have improved pain and function following primary THA with short-term follow-up. These results are comparable to prior studies of adult ABMT patients undergoing THA and are encouraging given the complexity of the decision to perform hip arthroplasty in the medically complicated very young patient.

Keywords: Bone marrow transplant, Total hip arthroplasty, Osteonecrosis, Outcomes.

How to cite this article: Ledford CK, Vap AR, Bolognesi MP, Wellman SS. Total Hip Arthroplasty in Very Young Bone Marrow Transplant Patients. The Duke Orthop J 2014;4(1):19-23.

Source of support: Nil

Conflict of interest: None

1234

Retrospective Review
Walter Harrill Wray MD, Jeffrey Greenberg MD, Josh C Vella MD

Safety and Efficacy of Arthroscopic Volar Carpal Ganglion Excision: An Anatomic and Clinical Study

[Year:2014] [Month:July-June] [Volumn:4 ] [Number:1] [Pages:32] [Pages No:27-32]


ABSTRACT

Purpose: Arthroscopic ganglionectomy is a viable alternative to open treatment and has widely been applied to treatment of dorsal ganglion pathology. The technique of arthroscopic volar carpal ganglion excision has recently been developed, and there is little peer-reviewed clinical evidence detailing its safety and efficacy. This study aims to present our experience with the development and implementation of this technique.

Materials and methods: In the anatomic portion of the study, three cadaver arms were positioned for wrist arthroscopy and dissected to determine the distance between the volar capsule and adjacent vital structures. Ten axial wrist MRIs were reviewed to further define the distance between the volar capsule and adjacent vital structures.
In the clinical portion of the study, 15 patients (mean age 47 years) treated with arthroscopic volar carpal ganglion excision were evaluated. Final follow-up occurred at an average of 48 months (21-68 months). Fourteen patients completed a MHQ and 12 patients were able to return for clinical evaluation.

Results: The wrist dissection and the MRI both showed the radial artery, FPL and FCR to all be within 1 cm of the working area. The radial artery was adjacent to the capsule and at risk when the capsule was approached from the 6 R portal.
Clinically, there was a small but significant difference in the Michigan Hand Questionnaire scores between the operative and nonoperative wrists postoperatively (93.3 vs 98.5, p = 0.004). There was one recurrence (6.7%), not requiring further surgery, and 1 complication (6.7%), which did require a secondary procedure. Mean time to return to work was 11.2 days (1-91 days, N = 11). Mean time to return to maximum function was 5.6 weeks (N = 11). There was a significant difference in mean wrist extension of the operative vs nonoperative wrist (58.8 vs 66.3°, p = 0.01, N = 12). There was no significant difference in mean flexion of the operative vs nonoperative wrist (71.7 vs 71.3°, p = 0.7, N = 11) or grip strength between operative and nonoperative wrists (31.8 vs 34.9 kg, p = 0.06, N = 12).

Conclusion: This small anatomic and clinical series demonstrates that arthroscopic volar carpal ganglion excision is a safe and effective procedure with a low recurrence rate. We no longer use the 6R portal when excising volar carpal ganglions.

Level of evidence: IV therapeutic

Keywords: Arthroscopy, Carpal, Efficacy, Excision, Ganglion, Safety, Wrist.

How to cite this article: Wray WH, Greenberg J, Vella JC. Safety and Efficacy of Arthroscopic Volar Carpal Ganglion Excision: An Anatomic and Clinical Study. The Duke Orthop J 2014;4(1):27-32.

Source of support: Nil

Conflict of interest: None

1198

Special Interest Article
R Andrew Henderson

Emily Berend Adult Reconstruction Symposium

[Year:2014] [Month:July-June] [Volumn:4 ] [Number:1] [Pages:32] [Pages No:xxxvi]


ABSTRACT

April 19th and 20th 2013 marked the fifth annual Emily Berend Adult Reconstruction symposium held at Duke University Medical center, co-hosted by brothers and former Duke Orthopaedic residents Keith R Berend, MD and Michael E Berend, MD. The yearly symposium is held in honor of their late mother who held tremendous regard for the Duke Orthopaedic Residency Program and the training it afforded her sons. An event skyrocketing in popularity since its inception, the course allows faculty from all over the country to engage in scholarly discussion about the latest trends and topics in hip and knee reconstruction, as well as cadaveric dissections/demonstrations and fellowship with one another.

1050

Special Interest Article
Norah Foster

Annual Uganda Spine Surgery Volunteer Trip

[Year:2014] [Month:July-June] [Volumn:4 ] [Number:1] [Pages:32] [Pages No:xxxvii-xl]


ABSTRACT

Let it be: The Duke 2013 Uganda Medical Mission Experience

Sister Florence was the day floor nurse. She has been there many years and could accomplish anything with the barest of bones supplies. She and few other nurses managed all the spine ward patients which could be up to about thirty patients, many of which were quadriplegic or paraplegic and had significant needs. She was a hard worker to say the very least and she had the kindest soul. As we hurried in the first morning eager to get our shipped supplies unpacked, we came upon a minor delay as they were under lock and key and the individual with the key was not present. Used to the hustle and bustle of the US where we rarely have idle hands and continuously run the proverbial rat race in order to get things done, we were rather frustrated. Sister Florence merely said with a quiet calm, ‘Let it be’. And so we did.

1037

Letter
Benjamin Alman MD

Letter from the Chairman

[Year:2014] [Month:July-June] [Volumn:4 ] [Number:1] [Pages:32] [Pages No:xv-xvii]


ABSTRACT

Discovering opportunities: a 2020 vision for duke orthopaedics

Our Duke Orthopaedic family remains incredibly productive, despite the many challenges we face in our environment. This past year, we faced changes in the leadership of the Department as well as in many aspects of the larger Duke academic health enterprise; the adoption of a new electronic medical record and changes in healthcare funding, such as in North Carolina Medicaid. Despite these challenges, we came through the year stronger than ever. It is a testament to the industriousness, creativity, innovation, and loyalty of our faculty, staff and trainees that the department remains incredibly strong.

981

Special Interest Article
Alexander R Vap

Atlanta Rotation Experience

[Year:2014] [Month:July-June] [Volumn:4 ] [Number:1] [Pages:32] [Pages No:xlii]


ABSTRACT

As a Duke resident, one’s fourth year is an exciting time. Now a senior resident, your role within the residency begins to transition to one of a leader and a teacher for junior residents. It is also a time when fellowship interviews, the important next step in one’s future career, take place. Most importantly, it is a time when all eight residents travel away from the Duke nest for a period of 6 months. For the fifth straight year, four residents have traveled south to spend that time with the staff of Children’s Orthopaedics of Atlanta at Atlanta’s Scottish Rite Pediatric Hospital.

951

Special Interest Article
John S Lewis

Indo-US Foot and Ankle Surgery Conference 2014

[Year:2014] [Month:July-June] [Volumn:4 ] [Number:1] [Pages:32] [Pages No:xxxiv-xxxv]


ABSTRACT

The 5th Annual Indo-US Foot and Ankle Surgery Conference, founded and sponsored by the Parekh Family Foundation, was held from January 10th to 12th in Jaipur, India. Since its inception five years ago, the aim of the conference is to disseminate and share techniques in foot and ankle surgery with orthopaedic surgeons from the United States, India, South Asia, Europe, and beyond. An international faculty comprised of delegates from these regions run academic informational sessions, oversee instructional sawbones courses, and perform surgery while narrating via live video feed to the conference’s attendees.

936

Original Research
Todd E Bertrand MD, Michael P Bolognesi MD

Clinical Outcomes of First 100 Navigated Total Knee Arthroplasties at Duke University Medical Center

[Year:2014] [Month:July-June] [Volumn:4 ] [Number:1] [Pages:32] [Pages No:13-18]


ABSTRACT

Background: Total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is one of the most clinically successful and cost-effective interventions in medicine. Implant malalignment can be a cause of early failure following total knee arthroplasty. Computer-assisted surgery has been employed to improve the precision of component alignment.

Questions/purpose: We asked: (1) What is the average coronal plane alignment of the first 100 patients undergoing computerassisted total knee arthroplasty at our institution? (2) How do our clinical and radiographic results compare to those values reported in the literature? (3) Was a ‘learning curve’ present as evidenced by improvements in coronal plane alignment over time?

Methods: We retrospectively reviewed our first 100 patients undergoing computer navigated total knee arthroplasty. We calculated postoperative knee range of motion (ROM), coronal alignment as well as preoperative and postoperative Knee Society Scores. Minimum follow-up was 4.3 years (0.2-8.25 years).

Results: Of the 100 patients, average postoperative limb alignment was 0.9° varus compared to the mechanical axis. Seventy-nine percent of patients had coronal plane alignment of ±3°. Knee Society Scores improved on average from 60 preoperatively (52-67) to 85 postoperatively (56-97).

Conclusion: Computer-assisted total knee arthroplasty is potentially a way to improve component alignment and overall patient satisfaction. In our cohort, average coronal alignment was similar to literature reported values for navigated and conventional total knee arthroplasty. The benefit of this technology remains unproven. Level of evidence: Level IV

Keywords: Total knee arthroplasty, Computer navigation, Outcomes.

How to cite this article: Bertrand TE, Bolognesi MP. Clinical Outcomes of First 100 Navigated Total Knee Arthroplasties at Duke University Medical Center. The Duke Orthop J 2014;4(1):13-18.

Source of support: Nil

Conflict of interest: None

906

Special Interest Article
Elizabeth Hubbard

Piedmont Orthopaedic Meeting Update

[Year:2014] [Month:July-June] [Volumn:4 ] [Number:1] [Pages:32] [Pages No:xxix]


ABSTRACT

The 2013 Piedmont Meeting took place at the Cloister in Sea Island Georgia. There was an impressive attendance, which included current and former faculty as well as former residents. Current residents who attended the meeting included Dr Jordan Schaeffer, recipient of the John M Harrelson chief resident teaching award, Drs Philip Horne and Jason Jennings, recipients of the Ralph Coonrad pediatric orthopaedics traveling fellowships, and Dr Elizabeth Hubbard, recipient of the William S Ogden Jr junior resident award.

897

Special Interest Article
R Andrew Henderson

Duke Medical Pavilion Write-up

[Year:2014] [Month:July-June] [Volumn:4 ] [Number:1] [Pages:32] [Pages No:xxii-xxiii]


ABSTRACT

For those who are not already aware, the physical plant of Duke Hospital has undergone a remarkable transformation over the past 5 years. Gone are the hospital-to-clinic monorail system and the old Bell Building. In their place, several state-of-the-art facility additions have opened in the space between the Duke South clinic building and the main hospital at Duke North. While the new Cancer Center and Medical School buildings are themselves tremendous additions to our medical landscape, perhaps the highlight of our infrastructure is the new Duke Medical Pavilion (DMP) which opened for business in July 2013.

887

Letter
Jonathan A Godin MD MBA, R Andrew Henderson MD MSc, Elizabeth W Hubbard MD

Letter from the Editors

[Year:2014] [Month:July-June] [Volumn:4 ] [Number:1] [Pages:32] [Pages No:xiii]


ABSTRACT

Dear Colleagues,

This year marks the fourth installment of the Duke Orthopaedic Journal. This has been a year of reflection for the editorial board. As the journal matures, we must decide if the Journal should be a memoir of the past academic year supplemented by scientific articles or a PubMed-indexed journal, produced by the residents and faculty of Duke Orthopaedics. We hope that the Journal will soon be referenced on research databases, but we do not want to change the Journal’s identity as a unique publication updating readers on the year’s highlights and accomplishments within Duke Orthopaedics. In doing so, we continue to build upon the vision and dedication of the Journal’s founders: Dr Selene Parekh, Dr Will Eward and Dr Stephanie Mayer to expand the scope, visibility and credibility of the Journal within the scientific community.

879

Special Interest Article
Jonathan A Godin MD MBA

Resident Awards

[Year:2014] [Month:July-June] [Volumn:4 ] [Number:1] [Pages:32] [Pages No:xx]


ABSTRACT

William Ogden Junior Resident Award

Each year, the chief residents select the third year resident who they feel best embodies the intangibles possessed by Dr Ogden. These characteristics, including passion, teamwork, work ethic, integrity and professionalism, make the Duke Orthopaedics residency special. In 2013, Dr Elizabeth Hubbard was chosen for this special honor. Dr Hubbard has a long history of excellence. Born and raised in Delaware, she attended Siena College in Upstate New York, where he was both an award-winning student and a standout volleyball player. After graduating from college, she went to nearby Albany Medical College, where she established herself as a diligent, hardworking student with a passion for Orthopaedics. While at Duke, Dr Hubbard has been a role model for all of us. She provides compassionate patient care, and she always goes the extra step. Outside of her clinical responsibilities, Liz was awarded a prestigious OREF research grant to study the role of computer-assisted training in sacroiliac screw placement. She cares deeply about the Duke Orthopaedics program and holds all of us to the highest standard of excellence and professionalism. There is no better role model for our junior residents than Dr Hubbard, who always puts the patient and her co-residents first. Dr Hubbard is planning a career in pediatric orthopaedics.

795

Special Interest Article
Elizabeth Hubbard

Asheville Rotation Update

[Year:2014] [Month:July-June] [Volumn:4 ] [Number:1] [Pages:32] [Pages No:xli]


ABSTRACT

One of the highlights of our residency program is the 6 months rotation that 4th year residents spend working at the Asheville VA. This experience is one of the few rotations where residents play a major role in the clinical decision making for their patients, both in the operating room and in the clinics. With the guidance of Drs William Ogden, Frank Brown, John Lucey, Robert Francis, Richard Fellrath, Carey McKain and Glenn Rechtine, this is arguably one of the most educational and challenging times in residency because of the independence that is afforded to each resident surgeon. In the words of Dr Ogden, ‘More than anything else, (in Asheville) you are taught to be in-charge of the operating room and how to be in-charge of yourself.’

737

Special Interest Article
R Andrew Henderson

Faculty Teaching Award

[Year:2014] [Month:July-June] [Volumn:4 ] [Number:1] [Pages:32] [Pages No:xxi]


ABSTRACT

Each year the outgoing chief residents select one attending surgeon who they feel has had the greatest impact on their collective residency training. In June of 2013, the departing chief class selected Dr Michael Bolognesi as the recipient of this departmental honor. It is the highest award given from the residents to our faculty, and given the sheer number of wonderful teachers scattered throughout the department of Orthopaedic Surgery here at Duke, it is both a highlyselective and a prestigious honor.

726

Letter
Selene G Parekh MD MBA

Letter from the Faculty Advisor

[Year:2014] [Month:July-June] [Volumn:4 ] [Number:1] [Pages:32] [Pages No:xiv]


ABSTRACT

It gives me great pleasure to present the 2013-14 Duke Orthopaedic Journal (DOJ). This year marks the 4-year anniversary of the Journal. As we have grown, the Journal continues to find its place in the tradition of Duke Orthopaedics.

711

Special Interest Article
Jonathan A Godin

The Bassett Society Update

[Year:2014] [Month:July-June] [Volumn:4 ] [Number:1] [Pages:32] [Pages No:xxiv]


ABSTRACT

The Bassett Society was founded in 1985 by Dr Frank H Bassett III, legendary orthopaedic surgeon at Duke University Medical Center. Dr Bassett served as the team physician for Duke Athletics from 1966 to 1993, but remained a prominent figure within the department even after retirement. He was known for his warmth and charisma, and inspired everyone he came into contact with students, athletes and doctors alike.

692

Special Interest Article
Jonathan A Godin

NCOA Update

[Year:2014] [Month:July-June] [Volumn:4 ] [Number:1] [Pages:32] [Pages No:xxviii]


ABSTRACT

The 2013 North Carolina Orthopaedic Association Annual Meeting convened at The Greenbrier in White Sulphur Springs, WV for three days of education and fellowship. The scientific portion of the meeting featured several Duke residents, including Drs Tyler Watters, John Lewis, Elizabeth Hubbard, Norah Foster, Cameron Ledford, and Jonathan Godin. Drs Ledford and Lewis took home the first and second place resident research awards, respectively.

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